Start of 2023 TBR: fantasy, poetry and … climate change?

I post so rarely that I’m amazed people still read these posts, but thank you and please share what books you are excited for this year.

Fantasy

  • Harrow the Ninth (The Locked Tomb #2) by Tamsyn Muir. I loved the first book, I’ve been struggling to get through this one to be honest.
  • Babel by R. F. Kuang (also dark academia): going in pretty blind, but hoping for the best.
  • A Vampire’s Redemption (The Inquisition Trilogy #2) by Casey Wolfe (queer): the first book was great!
  • The Library of the Unwritten by A. J. Hackwith: I don’t remember who described this as a morally gray type of character doing the trope of “coming out of retirement” and returning to power, only that protagonist is also a librarian.
  • Arcanum Unbounded by Bradon Sanderson: a collection of Cosmere stories.
  • A Master of Djinn by P. Djèlí Clark (queer): I’ve heard so many great things about this debut fantasy set in Cairo with murder mystery and secret societies.

Poetry

  • Lunch Poems by Frank O’Hara
  • Closer Baby Closer by Savannah Brown (released in february)
  • War of the Foxes by Richard Siken

Classics, memoirs and essays

  • Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (classic): I’ve tried getting through this book once already, I love the experience of reading it, but it’s so dense I struggle to get into it (more so than other classics even, idk why?).
  • The Lonely City: adventures in the art of being alone by Olivia Laing (essay/memoir): I wanted to read this when moving away from university, but it’s like four years later now.
  • Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom (memoir): I do not know anything about this book, but it appeared on my tbr shelf somehow.

Nonfiction and science

  • Immun by Anne Spurkland (in norwegian)
  • Firmament: the hidden science of weather, climate change and air that surrounds us by Simon Clark
  • The Story of More: how we got to climate change and where to go from here by Hope Jahren
  • Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer: this book keep being referenced in so many science podcasts I listen to!
  • Friends: Understanding the power of our most important relationships by Robin Dunbar

Personal project / rant

I don’t really do new year’s resolutions, but a type of personal project this year is read or watch more indigenous stories. Probably it would be mostly Sami related, as that’s the indigenous group I have closest knowledge / association with. Last year two separate things were in the national news here around the same time. The first was the question of how far climate change activists were willing to go, in terms of violence against property and/or people. The more I read of the discourse, the more I hated the existential negative parts which never pointed out successful past campaigns (like those fought by indigenous people for their local environment) or had any future strategies in mind. Because I get that climate change has gotten to the point where it is going to be bad anyway, but if you want to be an activist you should have thoughts on how you think it can be better, for your own well-being if nothing else. It hightlighted to me that the values which you base your «ideology» on matters. It’s too easy otherwise to fall into elitism, or the «the world would be better with less people in it» or, you know, eugenics.

Anyway. The other thing in the news a lot was Sami politics where there’s proof non-sami (and right-wing) people were encouraged to meddle in indigenous politics. Mostly to undermine rights and use of land or for financial gain, as far as I understood. And that also often has an enviromental side. It brought up the question of who is Sami «enough» to vote on Sami politics here, but the norwegian government has pretty well-defined requirements. And some fall outside of those, even if they would consider themselves Sami, so that is another debate. But personally I do fill every requirement to be considered part of that registry of Sami people. So I feel like it’s natural that I’ve come to a place where I want to know more.

On the science side, I’m taking atmospheric physics and climate change as a course, which has been great so far.

Down the TBR Hole #1

My TBR is currently 412 books according to goodreads. And that’s after I’ve really been trying to cut it down a few months ago, it just seem to fill up again because there’s so many good or interesting books out there. And they all take too much time to read. I’ve been thinking of a few different ways to cut down my TBR, but found I really enjoyed this way after seeing it on multiple blogs, so why don’t start here!

Rules

  • Go to your Goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 (or even more!) if you’re feeling adventurous) books. Of course, if you do this weekly, you start where you left off the last time.
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Infinity (Chronicles of Nick #1) by Sherrilyn Kenyon

Date added: July 2015

Goodreads

The main character is 14 years old and goodreads friends hasn’t liked it, along with never having heard of it since. On the other hand it has an average rating of 4/5 stars.

This has to go

People like us by Dana Mele

Date: November 2017

Goodreads

I thought I would let this go, but I just reread the synopsis and some reviews and while I’ve seen quite bad reviews on it, it’s also mentioned as a sapphic mystery. I have to read it now?

Keep

More than this by Patrick Ness

Date: before October 2016 sometime

Goodreads

I get that many people like or love this book, but while I like the plot of Patrick Ness’ other books, his writing doesn’t match with me.

Probably let go

The witch hunter by Virginia Boecker

Date: May 2015

Goodreads

The synopsis advertise it to people who like Graceling (MEE), but I’ve started this book before and been like “meeh”, before putting it down quickly. I didn’t really give it the try it deserve?

Keep and give another try

Opposition (Lux #5) by Jennifer L. Armentrout

Date: July 2016

Goodreads

I kind of have no interest of reading this book, but it’s the fifth and last book in the series, so why not just finish it.

Keep

Do you agree with my choices? Let me know