Tv series w/ flowers, bookclubs & bloodshed| Bi-Weekly Update

New book posts:

Other books I’ve been reading:

  • A lot of graphic novels! Post coming up.

Added to TBR:

  • The music and the mirror by Lola Keeley (lesbian ballerinas)
  • First position by Melissa Brayden (more lesbian ballerinas)
  • The lady’s guide to celestial mechanics by Olivia Waite (historical lesbians)
  • Almost home by Madison Kuhn (poetry)
  • Please don’t go before I get better by Madisen Kuhn (poetry)
  • Shame is an ocean I swim across by Mary Lambert (poetry, queer, tw for suicide and rape and probably more)
  • Her royal highness by Rachel Hawking (f/f romance, ya, enemies to lovers trope)
  • A matter of disagreement by E. E. Ottoman (m/m romance, trans mc, fantasy)
  • Wolfsong by T. J. Klune (fantasy, m/m romance)
  • Aphrodite made me do it by Trista Mateer (queer poetry)
  • Valkyrie by Sophia Elaine Hanson (poetry)
  • Damage control by Jae (lesbians)

Three things on my mind:

  • I’ve fallen in love with aesthetics like dark academia, light academia and cottagecore all over again. Mainly because I miss my homes, both the one in the valley village I left for university (cottagecore all the way), and the new one I created at university studying physics (where academia longing sets in).
  • In the same mindset I recently found two TV series and then the inspirations behind those, and didn’t realize before later how polar opposites they are. For the first time in a while I’ve been posting on my tumblr (same name) again, mostly about these.

Deadly Class” is extremely violent and (kind of) dark academia, just with assassins and found-family trope. What got me hooked on this series is how much the main character reminds me of Neil Josten when arriving to the team in The Foxhole Court by Nora Sakavic. They’re equally lost, traumatized & untrusting of everyone. The comics are simply multiple bloodbaths (truly, be warned!) as they continue where the cancelled-after-one-season TV series left it. Definitely search up trigger warnings before getting into it. It’s as far from young adult things you can come while also taking place in a boarding school.

“Anne with an E” is the polar opposite, just pure periodic drama, which isn’t usually my thing, but this has enough queer rich aunts and a girl who can’t stop creating stories, along with flowers and cottagecore aesthetics ft. a lovely bookclub hut built in the forest. It certainly has its darker hardships as well as a farming community tries to survive, but I have one season left and I’m going to savour it. Newly added to my favourite TV series.

  • I wrote about platonic love in my review of the graphic novel I Think I Am In Friend-Love With You by Yumi Sakugawa and since it’s been roaming around my head. I really think we need more platonic love things and reminders. Like I love the found-family trope, but it doesn’t really dive deep enough into that special bond that exists usually. There’s a reason many love the “I would die for you” friendships of the Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo.

Let me know how your quarantine is going! Link a post talking about it if you want to.

A Time to Dance by Padma Venkatraman

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This is a book about dance. It’s also about loss, spirituality, art, family, community and having trust in oneself and one’s abilities. 

Synopsis

Veda lives in India and she dances and competes in bharatanatyam. At least until a car accident leaves her with a below-knee amputation, making her unable to move the way she used to. She feels the loss of her connection to the goddess Shiva and dance. Both the stares and comments as getting to her as Veda tries to get back to her regular life, which feels empty without dance.

Then a doctor and a new dance teacher show how much they believe in her, arranging things so that she will still succeed to dance again. She might never be as perfect or the winner she was, but she can use dance as the art form it is to express herself. In the new school, she finds a community less competitive and more including. It’s all so beautiful, so maybe don’t read it in public if you don’t want to sit with tears in your eyes 30 pages in, at a bus stop the first day of school.

My thoughts

fire

Veda’s a beautiful person and it’s really frustrating and difficult going through the journey with her as you realize how tough she’s been on herself, even before the accident that made her feel pressured into hiding herself away.

“My skin tingles as I step into the music,
give in to the icy thrill of pleasure
that spreads through me whenever I dance,
the pleasure of leaping into a cool lake on a
sweltering day.” 

It’s actually the first book I’ve read in lyrical form told through verse but – and I can sense everyone fleeing, stop – the simplicity fits the story perfectly. Every word in here has a purpose, which made it really enjoyable as it naturally hops in time so we can see Veda’s recovery and the relationships she builds unfold. I loved the interactions with her family, which have their faults, and I love the philosophies on dance. Everything in this book was just perfect, without trying too hard to be.