Reading Goals of 2018 (November Update)

I had a couple informal reading goals this year.

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I wanted to: 

  1. Read more books with queer/lgbt characters
  2. Continue to read poetry and find what I like
  3. Read more science-focused books
  4. Read more than 40 books

I finished goal four, at least! As of november, this is where I’m at –

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Queer/lgbt books

I’ve definitely seen an increase in how much queer characters I read about. Both because I’ve seeked them out and definitely because of more diversity and representation. Before a lot of the mainstream books were “coming-out stories” and honestly, while it’s absolutely important to read about other’s struggles, what I need personally is  fluffy and cute stories to at least balance them out and give me back hope for my future and the world in general.

So here’s a few queer books I recommend from what I’ve been reading this year –

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda (of course) by Becky Abertalli

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Radio Silence by Alice Oseman

I Was Born for This by Alice Oseman

Finding poetry I like

Continuing last year’s theme by liking everything by Mary Oliver; here’s a review of the new and selected first collection, here’s of the second one.

Other than that there’s been a whole lot of mediocre poetry collections I’ve been reading. I think it’s because of the trap I often walk into by picking up what turns out to be this new modern “milk and honey” instagram poetry, which I have to admit to myself I don’t care for.

Counting Descent by Clint Smith was a powerful and brilliant collection as well, about being black in America and connection between history and present day.

I’ll say I mostly failed on this goal, and I’ll try to make up for it before the end of the year.

Science books

Here’s the terrible and guilt-ridden list of the science booksI’ve started and not finished this year:

  • The last half of Einsteins biography by Walter Isaacson
  • Letters to a young scientist by Edward O Wilson (horrible)
  • We have no idea: a guide to the unknown universe by Jorge Cham (interesting)
  • Six Easy Pieces by Richard Feyman (most likely to finish soon)

I also have bought Stephen Hawkings “The grand design”, and “the concept of anxiety” by Søren Kierkengaard. I finished “sapiens” though, so does history count? I definitely have failed this one, and it doesn’t help that I want to continually pick up new ones like I’m ever going to get to them.